Some of the Top Cards of 1976

Saturday, October 30, 2010

1976 Topps #600 - Tom Seaver





  • Tom Seaver was one of my favorite players. Three posters of ballplayers were on my wall during this time -- Seaver, Rod Carew, and Pete Rose.
  • A year-by-year entry of this legend's 21-year career would be quite long, so here are the highlights:
  • National League Rookie of the Year in 1967
  • Won three NL Cy Young Awards (1969, 1973, 1975)
  • Won 311 games in his career
    • Had 20 or more wins five times: 1969, 1971, 1972, 1975, 1977
    • Led the NL in victories three times (1969, 1975, 1981)
  • Had a 2.86 career ERA and led the NL in ERA three times (1970, 1971, 1973)
  • Had 3640 career strikeouts
    • Led the NL in strikeouts in 1970, 1971, 1973, 1975, and 1976
    • Struck out over 200 batters in nine straight seasons (1968-1976), narrowly missed the 200 plateau in 1977 (196), and then struck out 226 in 1978.
  • Postseason record:
    • 1969 NLCS 1-0, 6.43 ERA in one start
    • 1969 World Series 1-1, 3.00 ERA in two starts (pitched a complete-game 2-1 victory in the series-clinching game 5)
    • 1973 NLCS 1-1, 1.62 ERA in two starts
    • 1973 World Series 0-1, 2.40 ERA in two starts
    • 1979 NLCS 0-0, 2.25 ERA in one start
  • Was a 12-time All Star. All Star Game record:
    • 1967 - pitched a scoreless 15th inning to earn the save
    • 1968 - pitched two scoreless innings and struck out five batters
    • 1969 - on the roster but did not pitch
    • 1970 - started the game and pitched three scoreless innings
    • 1971 - on the roster but did not pitch
    • 1972 - on the roster but did not pitch
    • 1973 - pitched a scoreless 8th inning
    • 1975 - pitched on inning (the 6th) and got a blown save as he allowed a 3-run homer to Carl Yastrzemski
    • 1976 - pitched two innings (4th and 5th) and allowed one run on a Fred Lynn solo homer
    • 1977 - pitched the 6th and 7th innings and allowed three runs (two earned)
    • 1978 - on the roster but did not pitch
    • 1981 - pitched one inning (2nd) and allowed a run on a Ken Singleton solo home run
  • Pitched for the New York Mets from 1967 until the middle of the 1977 season
  • Was traded to the Cincinnati Reds for four players on June 15, 1977
  • Traded back to the Mets after the 1982 season
  • Pitched one season for the Mets (1983) but was left unprotected in the free agent compensation draft and was taken by the Chicago White Sox
  • Pitched for the White Sox from 1984 until the middle of the 1986 season
  • Traded to the Boston Red Sox for Steve Lyons on June 29, 1986
  • Finished the 1986 season with the Red Sox but was left off of the post season roster due to a knee injury
  • Attempted a comeback with the Mets in June 1987 but didn't pitch well in three minor league appearances and retired
  • Elected to the Hall of Fame in 1992 with the highest percentage of all time (98.84% - 425 of 430 ballots)
  • Seaver is the only player in the Hall of Fame who is wearing a Mets cap
  • Seaver has done a lot of broadcasting for NBC and for the Mets and Yankees since the end of his playing career
  • Tom and his wife own a vineyard in California
  • Baseball Digest articles:
  • Liked to face: Rance Mulliniks (.000 in 16 AB); Joe Pepitone (.043 in 23 AB); Ken Singleton (.061 in 33 AB)
  • Hated to face: Steve Ontiveros (.500 in 18 AB); Terry Puhl (.444 in 45 AB); Chris Cannnizzaro (.429 in 21 AB)

Footage of a very young Tom Seaver in his first major league game


Tom Seaver on The Baseball Bunch

1 comment:

  1. I'm 48yrs old and play amatuer baseball. My pitching mechanics are patterned after Seaver's. Bill James has Seaver rated as #6 pitcher all-time in his Baseball Historical Abstract, and that's after mostly older pre WW2 pitchers. Seaver pitched many years on rather average and some really bad teams. If he would have even the league average run support some of those years, he might have won 50 more games.

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